Andy Pan" class="rev-slidebg" data-no-retina> INNOVATION FUND Technology and AI in Healthcare Technological Innovations SHOWCASE 2019 Andy Pan" class="rev-slidebg" data-no-retina> INNOVATION FUND Technology and AI in Healthcare Technological Innovations SHOWCASE 2019

Can a 3D Printed Intraosseous (IO) Line Insertion Model Offer Similar Realism to Alternative Training Models?

Technological Innovations


Andy Pan

andypan@montfort.on.ca

613-746-4621 x3601

Association médicale universitaire de l’hôpital Montfort

Highlights

AHM-19-002 Simulation is especially useful for procedures that occur infrequently and for which first-time success is crucial in avoiding morbidity to the patient. Access to simulation centres remains limited to large academic centres and major barriers to ubiquitous access include cost and availability of equipment. Healthcare providers often have to travel to these larger centres to access simulation equipment for CME, which adds another layer of resource burden. Recently, 3D printing has emerged as a technology that can allow for inexpensive and accurate creation of anatomical models. Skill degradation is associated with adverse outcomes; however, taking a healthcare provider away from a community for CME can result in a void in coverage in under-serviced areas. 3D printing in medical education can provide an innovative solution to provide adaptable, just-in-time simulation in a cost-effective way that can be catered to the specific needs of individual healthcare institutions and practitioners.

Abstract

AHM-19-002 Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is a core component of both initial and continuing medical education (CME); however, the availability and costs associated with simulation models and sessions often limits accessibility. Simulation is especially useful for procedures that occur infrequently and for which first-time success is crucial in avoiding morbidity to the patient, such as intraosseous (IO) insertions for rapid vascular access. 3D printing has emerged as a technology that allows for inexpensive and accurate creation of anatomical models; however, its use in medical simulations is still in its infancy. The aim of the project is to create and test the fidelity of 3D printed, low-cost bone models for IO insertion. We will determine the realism of the models compared to stock and cadaveric models. It is currently unknown how well 3D printed models compare to cadaveric models and real-life clinical experience. We hypothesize that the study will show that 3D printed bone models are as good, more versatile, and more cost-effective than current commercially available simulation equipment. The results of this study will inform future studies that seek to develop other 3D printed anatomical simulation models. The results will further lay the foundation for a broader vision — with simulation and 3D printing, we envision the creation of an open-access central repository of simulation models and scenarios. Rural sites can simply “print” what they need when needed for teaching and CME.

Themes & Abstracts

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